I’m 22 days Weed Free but Unmotivated, Unproductive, and can’t Concentrate – any Advice?

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Hi Michael.

I’m really stressed out and hope it passes but I just can’t seem to get anything done.

I’ve been working on a personal academic project, I really want to get it finished but I’m so scatter-brained and unable to motivate myself to even get a little bit of the work done.

My memory is really falling apart, I have to constantly reread what I just read in order to use it in what I am writing. Also, I’ve been mostly watching Youtube or gaming for the last 3 weeks and I hate it but can’t stop?

On top of all that: Crazy mood swings! One minute I’ll be feeling okay and the next I’ll be depressed out of my mind, worrying that all this will never pass.

I don’t work right now and I can’t see myself passing an interview in this state, let alone working 8 hours.

I’m not going to start smoking weed again, no matter what. But I just feel so useless though and it sucks. Any advice?

Anonymous

Hey man.

After I quit weed, I had a really unproductive month or so. I would literally wake up, play League of Legends, buy fast food, play more League, then go to sleep. Some days I would try to get some work done, but like you I couldn’t focus or motivate myself at all.

At the time I felt terrible, but looking back now – the way I was living during that month – it was okay. I wasn’t using cannabis and getting high, and that was the priority. In fact, without all those other unhealthy comforts swaddling me, I’m not sure I would have got through that first month without breaking.

That said – I knew it couldn’t last for ever and even in my hazy brained state I made a plan to improve myself and escape my rut. Not by trying to push myself to achieve any specific goal, but by establishing one habit, and I know you’ve probably heard it a million times: Exercise. I downloaded the couch to 5k app for my phone and followed it. Being outside and doing something boosted my mood and made me feel much less useless.

With that under my belt, I looked to get a job. I thought I would be a mess in any interview just like you – but I took a “fake it till you make it” approach and landed something pretty easily. Only part-time, but again, having that “forced” professional human interaction for ~20 hours a week was really something that helped me feel “normal”.

During this entire time the desire to smoke stayed and the overarching depression continued to fill in the gaps. But it dampened over time, it does pass.

I feel a lot better now – and looking back I can’t believe the state I was in at the time! Just persevere, stay away from the weed and you’ll be fine with time, and if you really want to speed up the process – exercise is where I’d start. Hope this helped, friend!

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About the Author, <b>Michael Griffin</b>
About the Author, Michael Griffin

Michael is an ex-marijuana addict now living a hopeful, sober life. After spending thousands of hours helping hundreds of other people quit weed online, he started This Lucid Life to help even more people who are currently where he's been in the past to free themselves from cannabis. He wanted change, he found it, and he wants to help you find it too.

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